The Difference Between Vegan and Cruelty-Free

Vegan

No animal ingredients or animal by-products

Cruelty-Free

No animal testing on the end product or individual ingredients

When shopping for beauty, body care, or household cleaning products, you’ve probably noticed some logos on the packaging that all seem to be saying the same thing. What’s the difference between all those logos?

We’re going to cut out the confusion and clearly define what some of them mean so on your next shopping trip, you know exactly which products to grab.

Slide1


certified_vegan
To receive the Certified Vegan Logo, a product must contain no animal or animal by-products to include flesh, bones, dairy, eggs, honey, fur, leather, wool, down feathers, and cosmetics or chemical products tested on animals.

If you see this logo on a package it means:

  • The product does not contain animal ingredients like meat, fish, fowl, animal by-products, egg or egg products, milk or milk by products, honey or honey bee products.
  • There was no animal testing of the ingredients or finished product by supplier, producer, manufacturer or independent party
  • The product contains no known animal-derived GMOs or genes used to manufacture ingredients or finished products
  • Supplier verification has been provided to prove that animal products were not used in the manufacturing of ingredients

Source: vegan.org


cruelty_free_bunny

The Cruelty Free bunny logo is part of PETA’s Beauty Without Bunnies campaign. When you see this logo, you can know that the company and their ingredient suppliers do not conduct, commission, or pay for any tests on animals for ingredients, formulations or finished products.

 


cruelty_free_and_vegan_bunny

On other products, you may see this similar logo with “and vegan” added to it. In addition to following the same cruelty-free guidelines as the previous logo, this logo also ensures the product does not contain any animal ingredients.

Source: peta.org

 


not_tested_on_animals
The Not Tested on Animals logo from Choose Cruelty Free, indicates that the manufacturer (or suppliers or anyone on their behalf) has not tested any of its products or product ingredients on animals within at least the last five years.

CCF also has a strict policy on animal-derived ingredients and will not accredit a manufacturer if any of it’s products contain ingredients:

  • Derived from an animal killed specifically for the extraction of that ingredient
  • Forcibly extracted from a live animal in a manner that occasioned pain or discomfort
  • Derived from any wildlife
  • That are by-products of the fur industry
  • That are slaughterhouse by-products of a commercially significant value (meaning the animal was not killed specifically for the ingredient, but that the ingredient was available due to the animal being killed for other purposes)

CCF also will not accredit companies unless all parent and subsidiaries are also accredited (example, The Body Shop being owned by L’Oreal).

Source: choosecrueltyfree.org


leaping_bunny

The Leaping Bunny logo indicates that the product has not been tested on animals. Companies with this logo on their products have pledged to clear animal testing from all stages of product development. The company’s ingredient suppliers make the same pledge, resulting in a product that is guaranteed to be 100% free of new animal testing.

Source: leapingbunny.org


Look for products that are both vegan and cruelty-free to ensure the product you are buying contributed to absolutely no harm to animals.

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